Breathing, eating, sleeping, dreaming, looking, singing, listening, reading and drawing: Living
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weeklyshonen:

Ghibli HQs: 天空の城ラピュタ Tenkū no Shiro Rapyuta, 1986 []
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visualdevelopmentart:

Lorenzo E. Martinez - Hunchback of Notre Dame

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tir-ri:

Some step by step photos of my recent painting progress. The quality of my wip photos is always bad, but it has been even worse. :’D

Close-up pictures here.

Thank you so much for everyone, who have given me such kind feedback, it means a lot! 

tir-ri:

Proposal.

Alicia has had difficulties to keep her forest lush and green, since someone has been killing the trees. That’s when Everk here decided to approach her and suggest an agreement, which could benefit them both.

Inspired by a beautiful illustration made by Tove Jansson.

Painted with fine and thicker watercolors on Daler Rowney paper.

2sticks1drum:

the-adventures-of-nick:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

Wow This is fucking brilliant. My new favourite post on tumblr.

This is truly a work out art, props to whoever created this

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asylum-art:

Gorgeously Captures Intricate Paper Marbling Process by Oguz Uygur

Turkish filmmaker Oguz Uygur has gorgeously captured his parents’ delicate craft of erbu, also known as paper marbling. To create these beautiful patterns, first a tray is filled with water. Next, paint or ink is spilled, dabbed, dripped, sprayed, fanned, and/or pulled across the surface of the water. Sometimes additives and chemicals are applied to the mixture to create various textures. Thin wires are used to pull paint or ink into intricate patterns, with deliberate care taken for each design. Finally, a piece of washi paper is placed onto the water/paint surface with the intent to stain the pattern onto the paper. The paper is then allowed to dry before being used for calligraphy, book covers, and endpapers in bookbinding and stationery.This marbling method was first developed in East and Central Asia, as well as the Islamic world and is currently an important part of Turkish, Tajik, Indian, and other Asian and Middle Eastern cultures. Some of the marbled designs and patterns are reminiscent of the woven carpets typically found in similar regions. Uygur’s short film captures amazing detail and depth of field using close-up shots demonstrating the intricate attention paid to this form of aqueous surface design.

Seyit UYGUR { Ebru Artist } from oguz uygur (ozzie) on Vimeo.